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Start From 28/02/2011

Chapter lV Fundamental Rights and Obligations of Citizens

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Article 34. Lao citizens are persons who hold Lao nationality as provided by the laws.

Article 35. Lao citizens are all equal before the law irrespective of their gender, social status, education, beliefs and ethnic group.

Article 36. (New) Lao citizens aged eighteen years and above have the right to vote and those aged twenty years and above have the right to be elected, except insane persons, persons with mental disorders and persons whose rights to vote and to be elected have been revoked by a court.

Article 37. Citizens of both genders enjoy equal rights in the political, economic, cultural and social fields and in family affairs.

Article 38. Lao citizens have the right to receive education and upgrade themselves.

Article 39. (New) Lao citizens have the right to work and engage in occupations which are not contrary to the laws.  Working people have the right to rest, to receive medical treatment in times of illness, [and] to receive assistance in the event of incapacity or disability, in old age, and in other cases as provided by the laws.

Article 40. Lao citizens have the freedom of settlement and movement as provided by the laws.

Article 41. (New) Lao citizens have the right to lodge complaints and petitions and to propose ideas to the relevant State organisations in connection with issues pertaining to the public interest or to their own rights and interests.

Complaints, petitions and ideas of citizens must be examined and resolved as provided by the laws.

Article 42. (New) The right of Lao citizens in their bodies, honour and houses are inviolable. Lao citizens cannot be arrested or searched without the order of the Public Prosecutor[1] or the people's courts, except if otherwise provided by the laws.

Article 43.
Lao citizens have the right and freedom to believe or not to believe in religions.

Article 44. Lao citizens have the right and freedom of speech, press and assembly; and have the right to set up associations and to stage demonstrations which are not contrary to the laws.

Article 45. Lao citizens have the right and freedom to conduct studies in and to apply advanced sciences, techniques and technologies; to create artistic and literary works [;] and to engage in cultural activities which are not contrary to the laws.

Article 46.
The State protects the legitimate rights and interests of Lao citizens residing abroad.

Article 47. Lao citizens have the obligation to respect the Constitution and the laws, to observe labour discipline, [and to comply with] the regulations relating to social life and public order.

Article 48. Lao citizens have the obligation to pay duties and taxes in accordance with the laws.

Article 49. Lao citizens have the obligation to defend the country, to maintain the security and to fulfil military service obligations as provided by the laws.

Article 50. The rights and freedoms of aliens and apatrids[2] are protected by the laws of the Lao People's Democratic Republic. They have the right to file claims in the courts and [to lodge petitions with] other concerned[3] organisations of the Lao People's Democratic Republic and have the obligation to respect the Constitution and laws of the Lao People's Democratic Republic. [4]

Article 51. The Lao People's Democratic Republic grants asylum to foreigners who are persecuted for their struggle for freedom, justice, peace and scientific causes.


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[1] The term ?Public Prosecutor? has been chosen because it is the English term commonly used in Laos for this title/institution. Readers from common law jurisdictions should note that the Lao Public Prosecutor has considerably more powers than public prosecutors in their home jurisdictions and is more akin to a procurator in socialist systems. Another translation in common use is ?People?s Prosecutor?. Readers should also note that the term is principally used in the Constitution to refer to the ?office? or ?organisation? of public prosecutors rather than to refer to individual prosecutors. Where the context of a literal translation does not clearly indicate which of these two meanings is intended and it is clear from the original that the office is intended, this translation shall use the term ?the [Office of the] Public Prosecutor?.

[2] Readers may wish to refer to the Law on Lao Nationality for the distinction between aliens, apatrids (i.e. persons unable to certify their nationality) and foreign individuals.

[3]
The term ?concerned? is used in the sense of ?relevant?.

[4] For readability, the structure of this sentence has been modified.

 



ການເລືອກຕັ້ງ ສສຊ ຊຸດທີVII


ການເລືອກຕັ້ງ ສສຊ ຊຸດທີ VIII

 

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